Pancreatic Cancer

Xeloda and Abraxane for pancreatic cancer

Xeloda has some activity alone in pancreatic cancer. Mostof what we know about Xeloda in this cancer, is known about combining it with gemcitabine. Less is know about combining it with Abraxane. In 2009, Abraxane was given orphan status for the treatment of pancreatic cancer and Stage IIB-IV melanoma. An orphan designation means  that the FDA sees a need to investigate a drug for a specified indication. There had been no trials or publications

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Nexavar for pancreatic cancer – pro

Nexavar is currently FDA approved for renal cell carcinoma and hepatocellular carcinoma . Sorafenib (Nexavar) is designed to interfere with growth of new blood vessels and the growth of new cancer cells.Inhibition of KIT signaling provides a direct anti-tumor effect in most GIST tumors and inhibition of VEGF receptors and PDGFR-β provide antiangiogenesis effects (similar to Sutent). Since RAF is downstream of KIT, inhibition of RAF might also contribute

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Hepatoblastoma – pro

Hepatoblastoma is a rare pediatric cancer that can be cured by surgery. Preoperative chemotherapy followed by complete surgical excision according to International Society of Paediatric Oncology guidelines yields excellent results with a current survival rate of 80%.Liver transplantation is a curative option as well.Various chemotherapy regimens have been reported but there are no prospective studies and no studies of second line chemotherapy. Czauderna

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Interferon for pancreatic cancer

Interferon is known to have anti-proliferative effects against pancreatic cancer cells and mesothelioma. Unfortunately, clinical evidence for effectiveness is lacking. Most available studies had been in adjuvant settings where the drug's anti-angiogenic(blood vessel formation) properties may be most prominent. A few metastatic studies do not demonstrate a marked benefit of adding interferon to chemotherapy.   NeoPlas Innovation’s Stephen Cantrell,

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Readmission After Pancreaticodudenectomy (Whipple)

The Whipple procedure can cure localized pancreatic cancer but it is complex and has many complications and a  significant readmission rate to treat complications. In a recent review of experience at Johns Hopkins, readmission rates have been decreasing as surgeons become more experienced with this operation. When early and late complications were compared, patients with early complications were likelier to be readmitted for delayed gastric emptying

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Proton Beam Radiotherapy

Charged-particle beams consisting of protons or helium ions are a type of radiation therapy that uses particles which is different from conventional radiation that uses electromagnetic (i.e., photon) radiation. Particles have the unique properties of minimal scatter as the particulate beams pass through the tissue. As such, there is less “collateral damage” to the surrounding tissue and it is possible to ensure a more precise deposition of the

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Gemcitabine for Adjuvant Therapy of Breast Cancer

Occasionally one encounters the situation of a breast cancer patient who received four cycles on Adriamycin and Cytoxan as adjuvant therapy after her surgery, but when the second part of the treatment begins, and she received Taxol or Taxotere, she has a reaction and cannot tolerate it. Some physicians than give four cycles of gemcitabine instead of a taxane. Unfortunately, this practice has not been formally studied.  Unlike for pancreatic cancer,

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